TFS (2010) to SVN using a modified tfs2svn

UPDATE Jul 15 2012: I have linked my changes at the bottom of the post so you can either grab the bin or the changed files.

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Last year I wrote on how our org used tfs2svn to get us out of some jams when our TFS / SvnBridge / ReviewBoard solution was returning errors (Migrate TFS to SVN). We had been using that solution merrily while TFS 2008 Server was in play. Disaster struck when the infrastructure guys upgraded last week to TFS 2010 taking full advantage of the  new TFS 2010 Collections paradigm. What the new Collections does is alter the URL so that part of the path after the domain is the collection and part is the repository path (ex: http://tfsserver:8080/tfs/collection/myProject/trunk where the “http://tfsserver:8080/tfs/collection/” part is the server and collection declaration and the “/myProject/trunk” part is the TFS repository path “$/myProject/trunk”.

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Migrate TFS to SVN

We have been quite happy running our ReviewBoard / TFS server at work however every once and a while we would get errors during review creation. It turned out that some times the files would get corrupt during the TFS to SVNBridge to SVN diff. This would manifest when the “post-review” command would fail during the SVN diff procedure with logged errors such as:
'svn: XML data was not well-formedn', 'svn: Error reading spooled REPORT request responsen'

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Codeswarm visual for software projects

I was installing SVN on my work PC when I noticed that CollabNet had a video of their SVN submission history. The video demonstrated a moving timeline with a developer’s name surrounded by the files they commit in a sort of firework display. The project called code_swarm (http://code.google.com/p/codeswarm/) is a Java project that parses out source control server history and creates these displays in a processed window. After trying the program out I thought that it would be a fantastic tool to encourage developers to commit small and commit often to “see their name in lights”. As an Agile Programming lover, the concept of continuous integration immediately came to mind and I know that this is a hard concept to get developers to buy into.

I was so impressed with this project that I decided to join it to contribute any way that I can. Everyone should take a look at the Subversion, Apache, and Eclipse codeswarm videos….really nifty.